Eva Scalzo πŸ‡΅πŸ‡· @evascalzo · Jan 24

Re: the BLURB. Is it bogged down in backstory? Does it have nothing to do with the sample pages you are about to show me? Does it give us a clear sense of the stakes & conflict? Those are the types of questions you should ask yourself when you write them. (cont.) #querytip 9a/10

Eva Scalzo πŸ‡΅πŸ‡· @evascalzo · Jan 24

PROOFREAD. And send your query and sample pages to someone else and have them critique it/proofread. And then proofread it some more. Typos exist and everyone makes them, and aren't the end of the world. But the cleaner your copy, the better. #querytip 8/10

Eva Scalzo πŸ‡΅πŸ‡· @evascalzo · Jan 24

Even when using an online form, I like to see the query in letter format. I like to see a salutation (Dear Eva, is perfectly fine), but I also like a hint of what it is I'm about to read about (TITLE is my GENRE of XX words). (cont.) #querytip 6a/10

Eva Scalzo πŸ‡΅πŸ‡· @evascalzo · Jan 24

Titles matter because they are the first thing we see when you are introducing us to your manuscript. A really terrible title might be memorable but leaves you with a not-great first impression and that's not what you want when you're querying. #querytip 5c/10

Eva Scalzo πŸ‡΅πŸ‡· @evascalzo · Jan 24

Or is there a line in the manuscript that resonates? Find some way to adapt that into something that evokes the story. Avoid subtitles. And remember to not get too attached, titles often change at the publisher. (cont.) #querytip 5b/10

Eva Scalzo πŸ‡΅πŸ‡· @evascalzo · Jan 24

TITLES. Listen, I'm bad at titles. I think they're impossible. BUT I'm convinced I'm not nearly as bad as I think when I look at so many of the titles I see in my inbox. Look at other books publishing in your genre, see what the trend is and mimic it (cont.) #querytip 5a/10

Eva Scalzo πŸ‡΅πŸ‡· @evascalzo · Jan 24

Every agent is different so check submission guidelines. I ask for query + first 3 chapters. Your book doesn't have chapters? Then send me the first 30 pages. Don't send me 3 random chapters, don't send me 10 pages, don't send me things I don't ask for. #querytip 4/10

Eva Scalzo πŸ‡΅πŸ‡· @evascalzo · Jan 24

This all comes back to point #2, which is KNOW YOUR GENRE. #querytip 3d/10

Eva Scalzo πŸ‡΅πŸ‡· @evascalzo · Jan 24

First & foremost publishing is a business. On the craft side, if your Adult SFF is clocking in at 50K, that alerts me that not enough work has been put into worldbuilding. Your YA romcom at 150K says to me that not enough has been done to address pacing. (cont.) #querytip 3c/10

Eva Scalzo πŸ‡΅πŸ‡· @evascalzo · Jan 24

Usually, exceptions happen for ESTABLISHED authors. The thing about word count (outside of craft) is that you must consider the ECONOMICS of publishing. The higher the word count the more $$$ is costs to produce your work and the less $ everyone earns. (cont.) #querytip 3b/10

Eva Scalzo πŸ‡΅πŸ‡· @evascalzo · Jan 24

WORD COUNT. There are so many resources out there for writers that offer guidance on appropriate ranges for debut authors in different genres. One response I see a lot is x publisher printed a 400K work, so why can't I? That is the EXCEPTION. (cont.) #querytip 3a/10

Eva Scalzo πŸ‡΅πŸ‡· @evascalzo · Jan 24

Number one thing is know your genre & also know what genres I REPRESENT. Your literary fiction has elements of romance, that's great, still not a good fit for me as I do not represent literary fiction. Don't try to pretend your work is something other than it is. #querytip 2/10

Eva Scalzo πŸ‡΅πŸ‡· @evascalzo · Jan 24

Just realized that February 1st is in ONE WEEK and I'm re-opening to queries. I wanted to do a quick #querytip thread to avoid seeing some common mistakes/pet peeves/problems in the queries I get. #amagenting 1/10

paige wheeler @pwheeler_agent · Jan 24

#QueryTip

Even though agents want you to include a summary of your manuscript’s plot in your query letter, it is important to keep it to a minimum. Less is often more as it proves that you make every word count.

A.M. Rose @annmrose · Jan 24

A reminder writers that you are so brave. Putting your work out there to be evaluated and criticized by others isn't easy. It take so much courage. You should be proud of yourselves.
#querytip #WritingCommunity

Marie Lamba @marielamba · Jan 24

Heads up to writers - I've shifted the way I accept queries, and I'm now only accepting queries through QueryManager. Please query me by clicking on this link: QueryMe.Online/1710 #literaryagent #querytip #pubtip @JDLitAgency

Anna Sproul-Latimer @annasproul · Jan 24

A good agent will not encourage your reptile instincts to white-knuckle onto any one lead. See yesterday's tweet thread on completion bias: one of our primary value adds is to push back against our clients' irrational bird-in-handism.

Anna Sproul-Latimer @annasproul · Jan 24

Ninety-nine percent of the time--99%!--that "hey, book? I want to do a book with you!" email does NOT result in a book deal. The most typical outcome is that it devolves into a moving-goalposts situation where an offer doesn't materialize. (It does materialize sometimes! Rarely)

Anna Sproul-Latimer @annasproul · Jan 24

It SHOULD NOT signal: that this is the right opportunity for you. That you need to pounce on it this instant, or your opportunity to be an author will go away. That the editor's idea is one that you have to adopt.

Anna Sproul-Latimer @annasproul · Jan 24

Anna Sproul-Latimer @annasproul

Ooh I have a stray 5 min for a quick #pubtip smoke break.

::drags cigarette of cynicism:: If you're an author and an editor from a big 5 publishing house contacts you asking if there's a book in the works, congratulations! Here's what that should and shouldn't signal for you.

It SHOULD signal: 1. you're qualified to write a book; it's time to get over your imposter syndrome. 2. you're getting yourself out there well! Good work! and 3. If you don't have an agent, this is one of the best possible times to shop competitively and get one from the top tier