Kelly Van Sant (closed To Queries!)

Literary Agent

KT Literary

Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips

GW Neill @GWNeillscifi

@bookishchick How nerve wracking is it to take a pitch before a Publishers you haven't worked with before?
Replying to @GWNeillscifi

It's always exciting and nerve wracking to take something out on submission! I try never to pitch cold, so I usually speak with all the editors on my sub list before sending them anything. Placing a book is really about match making!

Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips
Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips
Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips
Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips

Susan Burdorf @sburdorf

@bookishchick #askagent Where do you see the agent's role going after the forced quarantines are over (i.e. more home-based agenting? less NYC influence in the industry?) or little change at all?
Replying to @sburdorf

Agenting is already one of the most flexible parts of the industry (I started in NYC but now in MN). I only hope the entire industry embraces this flexibility and creates more opportunities for disabled people and people of color and folks who otherwise experience access barriers

Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips

Susan Burdorf @sburdorf

@bookishchick #askagent How do you know you and an author will be a perfect fit?
Replying to @sburdorf

When I love the way they see and explore the world, so I know that I'll be interested in anything they write, because their viewpoint and expression and fascinations are endlessly appealing to me.

Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips

Kjell Hilding @KjellRules

@bookishchick @kianangu Is New Adult dead? What if you have teenage characters but adult situations (violence, drugs, swearing)? Automatically Adult now?
Replying to @KjellRules

It is rough out there for New Adult. As for content (violence, drugs, swearing) this comes down to the brand identity of the imprint, really. Some imprints will published edgier, gritty, dark YA. Some won't. That will be an important part of submission strategy.

Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips
Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips

Jill E. Warner @JillEWarner

@bookishchick When do you recommend getting sensitivity readers?
Replying to @JillEWarner

When the manuscript is finished to the best of your ability. Before you query, sometimes before you sub, and often after contracted. It depends on the book and the stage of your career, as well as the subject matter.

Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips

Shannon Hawkins @sionnanigans

@bookishchick @RedPenKaitlyn Say you’ve been with your client for years and they’ve had a handful of books under their belt, but they want to write their next project in a genre that you don’t represent. Is that something you’d allow, as they’ve already built repertoire and you believe the book may sell?
Replying to @sionnanigans

Personally, I want to work with my clients for the long haul and grow as they do, so I would work hard to get the necessary contacts to pitch whatever they write. If it’s truly beyond my skill, I’d loop in another agent in house with that expertise. Other agents might not do this

Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips
Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips

Candice @clyn1029

@bookishchick I’m nearly finished writing a ya novel with a diverse cast. I’ll be asking for feedback from beta readers and sensitivity groups, but I’m still concerned I’m writing a book that represents voices far from my own. Do you have any advice?
Replying to @clyn1029

First ask yourself why you feel the need to write in a voice that’s not your own. Then do your research, and recognize that it’s likely that you’ll do harm even if that’s not what you intend. Be prepared for that and be willing to learn and do the work.

Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips
Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips

Thea T. Kelley @TheaTKelley

@bookishchick Here's another question: Is this a good time to query a novel? If you advise waiting, why & how long?
Replying to @TheaTKelley

I mean, we are all doing our best. Some people cope by throwing themselves into work. Some people are reading less right now. No one knows how long this will last. I really think you have to make the choice that is best for *you* because the other factors are too unreliable.

Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips

Ember Randall @EmRandallWriter

@bookishchick @RedPenKaitlyn What if you have a book that could go either way, depending on how you edit it? (Mine is currently stuck in a squishy undefined part of the market, and needs to be put into one or the other)
Replying to @EmRandallWriter

You need to write the book you want to write, and you need to figure out your category and audience before you query. An agent might suggest changing it, but you need to come in with a clear point of view. Don’t leave it open ended.

Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips

JackieWrites @JackieKhalilieh

@bookishchick I may have phrased this wrong. Let’s say I do get a request for a partial/full, am I to assume that the agent fully read my sample pages first? Does that make more sense? :)
Replying to @JackieKhalilieh

I can’t imagine requesting something I hadn’t read (outside of live pitches, pitch contests, etc), so if you sent 5 sample pages then it’s safe to assume I’ve read them if I’ve requested the full. I imagine this would be true for everyone but maybe not?

Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips
Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips
Kelly Van Sant (closed to queries!)
@bookishchick
Literary Agent
Literary Agent & Contract Maven at KT Literary (QueryManager.com/kellyvansant). A mind at work. I'm a witch, and I'm hunting you. She/her
47 MSWL
69 AskAgent
8 Queries
44 Tips

Vic @corneliastreads

@bookishchick @kianangu When books go to auction, do publishers decide they want two/three books out of one manuscript? Or is number of potential books something author and agent work on before the book gets sold?
Replying to @corneliastreads

Number of books contracted is always negotiated at the offer stage (auction or otherwise). And agent and author should have a clear goal in mind, and of course the editor will have a publishing plan as well. Both sides then negotiate to come to an agreement.